April 2010

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GenerationOne Blog - April 2010


Education fails Indigenous students

This is a guest post from Emeritus Professor Helen Hughes, a senior fellow of the Centre for Independent Studies. Mark Hughes is an independent researcher. Their Indigenous Education 2010 is available here. Australia has to improve its education constantly, performing better from year to year in international benchmarks, to support productivity growth and quality of life. In the NAPLAN tests and My School website, Julia Gillard, the Minister for Education, has not only provided parents with vital information about their children’s schools, but given Australia an invaluable evidence base for school improvement. In general, Australian schools perform reasonably well. But Indigenous education is failing dismally. NAPLAN tests and the My School website confirm years of reports of Indigenous... More...

30 April @ 01:18 Add your comment

Our Music Video

Musicians from across Australia came together to make this happen — our anthem for the movement. What do you think? ... More...

28 April @ 09:15 Add your comment

Update from the Roadshow

Hello Fellow Aussies... It is with great excitement and joy to rejoin my GenerationOne team on the second phase of the Road show in Kalgoorlie on Sunday 25th April. The team were really busy and excited having travelled from Adelaide to Alice Springs , then onto Coober Pedy, with quick stops in Norseman and Ceduna before meeting back up with me in Kal. I personally will be visiting plenty of cities, regional centres and remote communities with a simple but profound message to all Australians – “youcan make a difference – to one person, one family, one community at a time!” To have the opportunity to travel around our great country to meet wonderful human beings who are contributing their bit to make this generation the first to eliminate the disparity between Indigenous and non-... More...

27 April @ 09:12 Add your comment

Andrew Forrest on Tiga Bayles' Let's Talk

On "Let's Talk" with Indigenous radio’s Tiga Bayles, Andrew Forrest talks about his journey from a young boy growing up with Aboriginal mates to his later success in business, and the sad decline and death, of his Indigenous childhood friends. It's one of the reasons Andrew Forrest started this campaign – to bring all of Australia together to end Indigenous disadvantage in our generation. Andrew argues strongly that we need to set the politics aside and look for real opportunities through jobs, education and training. ... More...

23 April @ 10:45 Add your comment

Great News!

GenerationOne has just signed-on to lead and grow our movement to end Indigenous disadvantage. Tim Gartrell will join the GenerationOne movement on May 10, in the newly formed role of CEO. From our press release: Founder of the GenerationOne movement, Andrew Forrest, said: “Tim is widely regarded as one of Australia’s premier campaigners and strategists. Combined with his passion for Indigenous Australians, he is the ideal person to take on this new role. “With Tim at the helm there is no doubt that the GenerationOne campaign will achieve the results all Australians desire. ... More...

20 April @ 09:02 Add your comment

Guest Blogger - Paul Knight, GenerationOne Spokesperson

Hi everyone, I am Paul Knight, a GenerationOne spokesperson. I have been working in Indigenous employment and training and have run my own business for the past 12 years. I am on board for the next few months with the GenerationOne roadshow. I am looking forward to visiting Alice Springs and Coober Pedy this week particularly after witnessing first hand an excellent project that will be commencing shortly on Groote Eylandt. The Australian Literacy and Numeracy Foundation just signed an agreement with the Australian Government to deliver literacy training to kids before they enter into the school education system. ... More...

19 April @ 08:24 Add your comment

My Story

This is a guest blog post from Marsha Emma Nupannga Nugari Riley My name is Marsha. I come from two different tribes and that is the Western Aranda and the Warlpiri tribe. The Community I come from is Ntaria known to others as Hermannsburg, and it’s approximately 100 km out west of Alice Springs. I live in Alice Springs as a boarder at St. Philip’s College. I have boarded ever since grade four at St. Mary’s which was run by the Anglicare Church. Finishing grade six at Bradshaw Primary School, I moved to St. Philip’s College and have been there ever since. I am here to tell you all a story of a girl who was raised by her Nana and that girl is me. I was five years old when my mum left me and I cried for days. So did my brothers. I lost a mother and a father at a very young age, I fel... More...

16 April @ 07:17 Add your comment

Direct Investment in Indigenous Jobs

Here is an interesting story: Larrakia Development Corporation in conjunction with Indigenous Business Australia has bought a 50% stake in the Vibe and Medina Grand Hotels on Darwin’s waterfont. Koolpinya Richard Barnes of Larrakia Development says: “This investment in the most vibrant sector of the hotel industry opens new training and employment opportunities for Aboriginal youngsters in the Top End. It will complement our existing businesses of land development, quality home construction, landscaping and repairs and maintenance.” ... More...

15 April @ 12:11 Add your comment

Communities back call for alcohol bans

The reasons for dysfunction in some communites are complex and can appear overwhelming. This article in The Australian talks about how several remote Western Australian communities are supporting alcohol bans, with at least part of the justification being to stop kids being kept awake at night stopping them from going to school: Officer in charge at Fitzroy Crossing Ian Gibson said there had been many problems stemming from alcohol abuse at Bayulu community, where a ban was to be imposed soon. He said because parents were up drinking late at night, children could not sleep, roamed the streets and were less likely to attend school. Domestic violence had also been a problem. ... More...

13 April @ 02:23 Add your comment

It's Personal

Why would some random, successful executive start a movement to help Indigenous Australians? It's the question everyone has been asking me since our recent historic launch. For me, this is very personal. I grew up with Aboriginal kids, and at age nine attended a hostel with my Aboriginal mates in Carnarvon, WA. I was blessed with education and opportunity but as I hit adulthood, my mates were left behind, lost eventually to welfare and addiction. I went to the last fella’s funeral last year. His name was Ian Black, one of the nicest, most talented youngsters I'd ever met, with a wide and easy smile. His premature death was too much and now the future of his kids keeps me awake at night. ... More...

09 April @ 09:17 Add your comment